Learning the Megalithic Language: Part 1 – by Robin Heath

Learning the Megalithic Language: Part 1 – by Robin Heath

Robin Heath is an independent researcher into ancient wisdom, specialising in archaeoastronomy and megalithic culture. He has written nine books on this and allied subjects, including the best selling Sun Moon & Stonehenge: Proof of High Culture in Ancient Britain, Power Points: Secret Rulers & Hidden Forces in the Landscape and Alexander Thom: Cracking the Stone Age Code. In a varied career Robin has enjoyed being a research scientist in computer chips, a marketing manager in electronics, a senior lecturer in mathematics and engineering and head of department in a college of further education. Since 1974 he has also been practicing as an astrologer and is a highly regarded  astrologer who has taught in all the leading schools of astrology in the UK and been the editor of the international Astrological Association Journal. You can find out more about Robin Heath and his work on his website: www.robinheath.info If you are wondering how the word ‘megalith’ becomes relevant on a crop circle website, then prepare for a big surprise, as researcher Robin Heath compares the ‘language’ of stone circles with that of crop circles, and finds many more similarities than one might expect. This article also explores the reasons why both subjects remain excluded from within the establishment.  Learning the Megalithic Language by Robin Heath All text & Images © Robin Heath  Part One : Asking the Right Questions Our connection with the megalithic culture has been sundered many times by the frequent and often massively disruptive cultural changes that inevitably followed the many serious incursions into all regions of this over-conquered land (Fig.1). Despite this, the British landscape still...
Star of Wonder – East Field 2005

Star of Wonder – East Field 2005

Above: Star of Wonder: East Field, Alton Barnes, Wiltshire | 3rd July 2005 | Wheat … Picking up fragments The formation that appeared in the great East Field, in Alton Barnes in 2005, is one of my all-time favourite formations. After doing some preliminary work on its geometry back in 2012, I recently found my original sketches and decided to complete the work I started. It also seemed apt to be doing this in the lead up to Christmas, as this was no doubt a Star of great Wonder… 2019 will mark the 29th year of my involvement with the crop circle phenomenon. I saw my first circle in the newspapers in 1990, by 1991 I had stepped in my first formation, 1992 brought the considerable and considerate gift of four crop circles, all within a mile or so of my house – they were considerate as I didn’t drive (I still don’t), and I could therefore walk to them. 1993 marked my first visit to Wiltshire to see the circles there and in 1994 I first began working with Steve and we have been visiting the circles and flying over them every season since. We have recorded many hundreds of circles in that time (perhaps even over a thousand) and, of course, in that time we have come across some really wondrous formations. The circle that appeared in East Field in the summer of 2005 is one of my all-time favourites; its sheer magnitude, elegant – yet complex design, and its location make this a circle that just stands out amongst its peers. My sense of this formation is further...
The Crop Circle at Longwood Warren 2018

The Crop Circle at Longwood Warren 2018

Above: Longwood Warren, Hants | 10th July 2018 | Drawn & Painted by Karen Alexander Its always difficult to keep up with drawing the circles during the season. Some drawings come easily, but some are a much more taxing proposition. Funnily enough, it’s not always the large and complex formations that present a problem, although as you can imagine, the more complex a formation the longer it might take to draw. Sometimes you come across a formation (or two) that you just don’t see geometrically, and it is they that can have you scratching your head for weeks, or sometimes months on end. It’s not always a complexity issue, every geometer has their blind spots, things that don’t come easily to them.  But sometimes, one just has to admit that some crop circles do not have a particular geometrical protocol – some are more like images/drawings rather than geometry. When that is the case, the best you can do is to make the best facsimile you can. Even then, there can be geometric elements to discover, but not a protocol per se. Detail The crop circle that was reported on the 10th of July at Longwood Warren in Hampshire, was both beautiful and intriguing. Its beauty lay not just in its design, but in the flowing-water-like lay of its interior. Its standing elements were few and relatively small compared to the expanse of laid crop in its interior, but when one looked at that interior, in many ways it seemed that that was what the formation was about. Even as we flew over this circle, you were immediately drawn...
A circle at Baggwilgraben, nr Bern, Switzerland

A circle at Baggwilgraben, nr Bern, Switzerland

Above: Baggwilgraben, nr Bern, Switzerland | 17th June 2018 | wheat | Drawn and painted by Karen Alexander The 2018 crop circle season included several formations outside of the UK. Sometimes people forget that the crop circle phenomenon is a worldwide spectacle. There were several international circles of note during 2018, including circles in Switzerland, France, the Czech Republic, Brazil, Canada and Russia. I’m hoping to get the time to draw one or two over the winter months (as time allows) and when I do I’ll post them up in mini-blogs like this one… Detail This circle at Baggwilgraben, nr Bern in Switzerland was reported earlier in the year on the 17th of June 2018. It appeared to be in a field of green wheat and looked to measure approx 150-180ft in diameter. It was a stunning whirling design, cookie-cutter crisp with a beautifully swirled centre. There have been several circles of high quality in Switzerland over the years and this one was one of the best. Geometry Like it’s later sibling at Niedrsherli, that would appear later in the year Read More, this formation was also essentially 12-fold in nature. On the drawing board the circle is divided by 24 to create all the points needed to draw the arcs (two points of curvature for each arc). The arcs are centred on the perimeter of the central flattened circle. A wide band is then dawn around the entire design, encompassing and containing the formation. I have often wondered if this containment is rather like a full stop, making each formation an entire statement or treatise. I have even wondered...
A circle at Niedrsherli, nr Bern, Switzerland

A circle at Niedrsherli, nr Bern, Switzerland

Above: Painting of the crop circle at Niederscherli, nr, Bern Switzerland, October 2018. The 2018 crop circle season included several formations outside of the UK. Sometimes people forget that the crop circle phenomenon is a worldwide spectacle. There were several international circles of note during 2018, including circles in Switzerland, France, the Czech Republic, Brazil, Canada and Russia. I’m hoping to get the time to draw one or two over the winter months (as time allows) and when I do I’ll post them up in mini-blogs like this one. Detail This circle at Niederscherli, nr Bern in Switzerland was reported just last month on October the 19th/20th. There was a circle near here earlier in the year in June (which will be the next one on my drawing board). This circle was reported by the press to measure 20 metres in diameter (65 feet), but from the photos it looks a lot bigger the this – anywhere from 100-150ft in diameter. The circle is in a meadow, or field, of grass (so no tractor lines to help with sizing) . It is quite unusual to have complex geometric formations in grass, but smaller, simpler circles are not uncommon at all. You can read the media report and see the aerial photos and footage here. Geometry I was immediately drawn to its geometry – a twelve-fold design. The circle is divided into twelve segments of thirty degrees each, and there are six overlapping circles that make up the bulk of the pattern. However, central to the underpinning of this design is an unseen ring on which the six overlapping circles are centred....
Blocks to Understanding

Blocks to Understanding

Etchilhampton, Wiltshire | 19th August 2015 | Wheat Note: You can click on any of the images in this blog for an enlarged view.  The second formation to appear at Etchilhampton in 2015 was also to be the last of the season. It was big, approximately 250ft in diameter, and was in a field of golden mature wheat. It looked impressive and majestic in the landscape. The geometry of the formation was rather novel. Nine stars ‘hold hands’ around the outer of the formation with two inner rows of nine small standing and flattened blocks in each. From the air one was immediately drawn to the ‘X’ shapes laid into the flattened crop, and as I sat down to draw this formation it was clear these X’s were a central part of the design as well as a very attractive part of the lay of the crop. There were twenty-seven X’s all together. Some of them were not used in the geometry of the design, but instead, gave anyone looking at the design an excellent pointer as to its construction. You can see some of the X’s in the large photo at the top of the page. The circle of the formation is divided into thirty-six segments and then seven concentric rings are created. Add in a narrow 8th outer ring to contain the entire design and the central circle and you nine. The entire design is picked from this geometric framework. The X’s helped create the nine hexagram stars which sat around the perimeter of the design. Interestingly, because of the way the framework was set out (partially in segments...