The Crop Circle at Longwood Warren 2018

Its always difficult to keep up with drawing the circles during the season. Some drawings come easily, but some are a much more taxing proposition. Funnily enough, it’s not always the large and complex formations that present a problem, although as you can imagine, the more complex a formation the longer it might take to draw. Sometimes you come across a formation (or two) that you just don’t see geometrically, and it is they that can have you scratching your head for weeks, or sometimes months on end. It’s not always a complexity issue, every geometer has their blind spots, things that don’t come easily to them.  But sometimes, one just has to admit that some crop circles do not have a particular geometrical protocol – some are more like images/drawings rather than geometry. When that is the case, the best you can do is to make the best facsimile you can. Even then, there can be geometric elements to discover, but not a protocol per se. Detail The crop circle that was reported on the 10th of July at Longwood Warren in Hampshire, was both beautiful and intriguing. Its beauty lay not just in its design, but in the flowing-water-like lay of its interior. Its standing elements were few and relatively small compared to the expanse of laid crop in its interior, but when one looked at that interior, in many ways it seemed that that was what the formation was about. Even as we flew over this circle, you were immediately drawn to the frozen movement of that laid interior. Geometric Clues The next thing that caught...

A circle at Baggwilgraben, nr Bern, Switzerland

The 2018 crop circle season included several formations outside of the UK. Sometimes people forget that the crop circle phenomenon is a worldwide spectacle. There were several international circles of note during 2018, including circles in Switzerland, France, the Czech Republic, Brazil, Canada and Russia. I’m hoping to get the time to draw one or two over the winter months (as time allows) and when I do I’ll post them up in mini-blogs like this one… Detail This circle at Baggwilgraben, nr Bern in Switzerland was reported earlier in the year on the 17th of June 2018. It appeared to be in a field of green wheat and looked to measure approx 150-180ft in diameter. It was a stunning whirling design, cookie-cutter crisp with a beautifully swirled centre. There have been several circles of high quality in Switzerland over the years and this one was one of the best. Geometry Like it’s later sibling at Niedrsherli, that would appear later in the year Read More, this formation was also essentially 12-fold in nature. On the drawing board the circle is divided by 24 to create all the points needed to draw the arcs (two points of curvature for each arc). The arcs are centred on the perimeter of the central flattened circle. A wide band is then dawn around the entire design, encompassing and containing the formation. I have often wondered if this containment is rather like a full stop, making each formation an entire statement or treatise. I have even wondered if each crop circle circle itself is like a living being, that the design somehow is alive. That’s...

A circle at Niedrsherli, nr Bern, Switzerland

The 2018 crop circle season included several formations outside of the UK. Sometimes people forget that the crop circle phenomenon is a worldwide spectacle. There were several international circles of note during 2018, including circles in Switzerland, France, the Czech Republic, Brazil, Canada and Russia. I’m hoping to get the time to draw one or two over the winter months (as time allows) and when I do I’ll post them up in mini-blogs like this one. Detail This circle at Niederscherli, nr Bern in Switzerland was reported just last month on October the 19th/20th. There was a circle near here earlier in the year in June (which will be the next one on my drawing board). This circle was reported by the press to measure 20 metres in diameter (65 feet), but from the photos it looks a lot bigger the this – anywhere from 100-150ft in diameter. The circle is in a meadow, or field, of grass (so no tractor lines to help with sizing) . It is quite unusual to have complex geometric formations in grass, but smaller, simpler circles are not uncommon at all. You can read the media report and see the aerial photos and footage here. Geometry I was immediately drawn to its geometry – a twelve-fold design. The circle is divided into twelve segments of thirty degrees each, and there are six overlapping circles that make up the bulk of the pattern. However, central to the underpinning of this design is an unseen ring on which the six overlapping circles are centred. This invisible ring is in a Golden Section relationship between two places at...
Blocks to Understanding

Blocks to Understanding

Etchilhampton, Wiltshire | 19th August 2015 | Wheat Note: You can click on any of the images in this blog for an enlarged view.  The second formation to appear at Etchilhampton in 2015 was also to be the last of the season. It was big, approximately 250ft in diameter, and was in a field of golden mature wheat. It looked impressive and majestic in the landscape. The geometry of the formation was rather novel. Nine stars ‘hold hands’ around the outer of the formation with two inner rows of nine small standing and flattened blocks in each. From the air one was immediately drawn to the ‘X’ shapes laid into the flattened crop, and as I sat down to draw this formation it was clear these X’s were a central part of the design as well as a very attractive part of the lay of the crop. There were twenty-seven X’s all together. Some of them were not used in the geometry of the design, but instead, gave anyone looking at the design an excellent pointer as to its construction. You can see some of the X’s in the large photo at the top of the page. The circle of the formation is divided into thirty-six segments and then seven concentric rings are created. Add in a narrow 8th outer ring to contain the entire design and the central circle and you nine. The entire design is picked from this geometric framework. The X’s helped create the nine hexagram stars which sat around the perimeter of the design. Interestingly, because of the way the framework was set out (partially in segments...
Liminality – By Robin Heath (Part 3)

Liminality – By Robin Heath (Part 3)

Crop Circles & the Geometry of Thresholds By Robin Heath We had the great pleasure of hearing Robin Heath deliver the keynote presentation at the Summer Crop Circle Lectures last year. It was one of the best lectures I’d heard him give in the long years I have known him; it was important, prescient and above all quite brilliant. He has very kindly given me permission to share that presentation with you and I will be posting Robin’s lecture notes and illustrations in a three part guest blog. I’d like to thank Robin for the opportunity to share his work on the Temporary Temples website – it’s a great honour! Robin Heath is an unaffiliated researcher into megalithic and ancient sciences. He is author of several books on Stonehenge, two of which are on sale at the monument. For more information, there are two websites:www.skyandlandscape.com and www.megalithicscience.org Robin lives on a smallholding in coastal West Wales with his wife Trish, two cats and three theodolites.   Please click on any of the images in this article for a larger view PART THREE (Click for part one and two) Some Conclusions from part two: The circle makers appear to be fully familiar with the traditional canon of measure. They incorporate this canon within beautiful (attention-seeking) designs, in plain sight, often adjacent to structures where the traditional canon was once employed, such as megalithic sites. It is possible that only people who understand both geometry and the canon of ancient measure can connect with the messages contained within crop circles. The principal (and apparently very gentle) message is that the circle builders are fully familiar with...
Liminality – by Robin Heath (Part 2)

Liminality – by Robin Heath (Part 2)

Crop Circles & the Geometry of Thresholds By Robin Heath We had the great pleasure of hearing Robin Heath deliver the keynote presentation at the Summer Crop Circle Lectures last year. It was one of the best lectures I’d heard him give in the long years I have known him; it was important, prescient and above all quite brilliant. He has very kindly given me permission to share that presentation with you and I will be posting Robin’s lecture notes and illustrations in a three part guest blog. I’d like to thank Robin for the opportunity to share his work on the Temporary Temples website – it’s a great honour! Robin Heath is an unaffiliated researcher into megalithic and ancient sciences. He is author of several books on Stonehenge, two of which are on sale at the monument. For more information, there are two websites:www.skyandlandscape.com and www.megalithicscience.org Robin lives on a smallholding in coastal West Wales with his wife Trish, two cats and three theodolites.   Please click on any of the images in this article for a larger view PART TWO (Click here for part one) Geometry, Astronomy & Astrology Threshold: the place between two different spaces or times From part one: … This is quite a varied set of views, opinions and suggestions, but it is representative of the kind of material that anyone investigation the crop circle phenomenon will come across during their searchings. It will lead at some stage to facing and hopefully answering the following questions… Part Two Who or what do we trust? Are there any absolute facts or anchor points? I believe that there are some answers, and now...