Wooton Wawen, Warks | 7th Aug 2017

Wooton Wawen, Warks | 7th Aug 2017

Monarch’s Way, nr Wooton Wawen, Warks This unusual and very pretty circle appeared on the 7th of August. The largest circle measures approximately 60ft in diameter and the formation is about 300ft in length (including the row of circles leading to a tree) – which seems like an umbilical row of beads seemingly tethering it to the tree in the field. However, the central feature of this crop circle has to be its elaborate floor lay in which a off centre sun with emanating rays can be seen. In some ways this circle and rays is similar to the circle at Stitchcombe earlier in the year, and is a recurring motif in crop circle design over the years. Some have linked it to the forthcoming eclipse – but in times past the design has had no such associations. To me this symbol showed how connected (tethered) the crop circle phenomenon is to the landscape in all kinds of ways – this was just one example. Photographic Enlargements: are now available of many of the 2017 crop circles click here to see our fantastic range. Visiting the Circles? If you are thinking of visiting any crop circles this summer, please read our Visiting the Crop Circles section. It’s full of useful information and etiquette for visiting the countryside and the crop circles. Please remember that you should not enter any fields without the express permission of the farmer. Please Help to keep us Flying in 2017: If you have enjoyed looking at our pictures and information please consider making a small donation to keep us flying. There are so few of us...
Rollright Stones, Oxon | 5th August 2017

Rollright Stones, Oxon | 5th August 2017

The Rollright Stones, nr Little Compton, Oxon The Rollright Stones are a ring of relatively small standing stones. According to folklore, the stones are a king and his courtiers, petrified into stone by a witch! In addition to the stone circle there are two other stone monuments nearby. The stone circle sits right next to a road, and on the other side of the road is a single standing megalith called the Kings Stone. Interestingly, although only over the road (literally), this stone lies in the county of Warwickshire – the road marking the boundary between the counties of Oxfordshire and Warwickshire. The third stone monument is a dolman called the Whispering Knights  – so named because of the way the stones lean into one another in a ‘conspiratorial’ posture. You can read much more about the Rollright Stones here. There have been circles at this location before, the last time in 2015. It is a very lovey location and well worth a visit if you can get there. The circle here measures approximately 180ft-200ft in diameter and is in a field of golden, mature wheat. There are several noteworthy features to this circle, the first of which is the weaving of the crop close to the centre of the formation and the very fine ring of standing stems which create the most delicate of enclosures for a radially laid centre circle. The second is the fascinating geometry; a marriage of eight and five. Eight and five are two sequential Fibonacci numbers and two of the most prevalent found in nature, followed by thirteen. If five and eight are...
Hannington, Wilts | 4th August 2017

Hannington, Wilts | 4th August 2017

Bydemill Copse, nr Hannington, Wilts Hannington lies north of Swindon in the north of Wiltshire. We have had several circles around this location in years past most notably in 2011 and 2012 where we had some early circles in oilseed rape crop there (see our archives for pictures). The circle measures between 180-200ft and is in a field of golden mature wheat. The pattern comprises several concentric rings and a twelve-fold pattern over four of them, made from a circular symmetry of circles! Four half-moons sit around the perimeter  at regular intervals – similar to the circle at Hackpen Hill this year which had six half-moons on its perimeter. Twelve is the number of man according to geometer John Michell, it is the base of all imperial measure (space), and our measure of time – 12 hours of the day, 12 hours of night, 12 months in a year, 12 constellations of the Zodiac etc. This link made a vital connection between space and time, something that is now disjointed with our metric system of measure (base 10) sitting alongside our still imperial measure of time. Twelve (like six) is an incredibly harmonious number, it is the number of edges in both the cube and the octahedron – both of which we have seen in crop circle design. These connections between number and form remind us that number in this aspect is a universal language which commands great poetry as well as great truth. Finally, twelve around one (to give thirteen) is found in myths and legends throughout history including Christ and his twelve disciples. These myths link twelve with...
Atherington, W. Sussex | 19th July 2017

Atherington, W. Sussex | 19th July 2017

Climping Beach, Atherington, (nr Littlehampton) W. Sussex Great locations are part and parcel of the crop circle phenomenon, ancient stones circles, chalk hill figures, hill forts, and barrows. But crop circles by the sea are unusual. This is in fact the second crop circle to appear by the coast in the UK this year. An early circle in oilseed rape (canola) was reported on May 24th close to St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall. You can see some footage of the Cornish circle here. This was to be a very memorable flight for us, along the south coast with views of Southampton, Portsmouth and Chichester harbours, Hayling and Thorney Islands. The little village of Atherington lies between Bognor Regis and Littlehampton in West Sussex and sits beside the charmingly named Climping Beach. The small wheat field is directly adjacent to the seashore so makes for a very picturesque location. It’s a small formation measuring approximately 150-160ft in diameter in a field of very mature wheat, with heads beginning to drop. The design is an attractive four-fold pattern made from a series of standing circles creating a cross design. The circles are standing and outlined by flattened pathways – it reminds me very much of the circle at Woolstone Hill earlier on in the year which is of a similar design-style. The small central circle is flattened and contains a very pretty weaved floor-lay. Four is the number of material reality, the material world, or the substance and matter of the world; the building blocks of all that is material. The cross represents the four cardinal points and the classical four...
Cley Hill, Wiltshire | 18th July 2017

Cley Hill, Wiltshire | 18th July 2017

Cley Hill, nr Warminster, Wiltshire Cley Hill is a well known landscape feature that lies to the west of the town of Warminster. A distinctive, soaring chalk hill, once shaped by ancient seas, it is an important site archeologically and biologically. It is the home to an abundance of grasses, wildflowers and insects. Read more here. It also lies close to Cradle Hill, a famous site during the ‘Warminster Mystery’ flap – a series of strange happenings including UFO sightings that occurred in the 1960s and 1970s. You can read more about the Warminster happenings here. You can also read Arthur Shuttlewood’s original book on the subject see here for more information. The crop circle that arrived on the 18th of July is truly awe-inspiring. A huge construction measuring approximately 500ft in diameter – simply huge! An isometric representation of  two star tetrahedrons (a 3D star made from two tetrahedrons). It is also known as a Merkaba star (which means light body), or perhaps even light soul/spirit. In Ancient Egypt the Ka and the Ba were the Spirit (vital spark) and the Personality. A third component the Akh – existed in the afterlife realm and was was reunited with the Ka and the Ba after bodily death. As an image of the non-physical manifestation of human kind it packs a spiritual punch. The central Merkaba star is contained within an elaborate six-fold flower pattern. The set of 12 small circles that link the large petals together are reminiscent of a circle that appeared at Lurkeley Hill, near East Kennett in the summer of 2005. See Geometry Gallery below for an image....
Hackpen Hill, Wilts | 8th July 2017

Hackpen Hill, Wilts | 8th July 2017

Hackpen Hill, nr Broad Hinton,Wiltshire Hackpen Hill is a regular site for crop circles and many have been seen there over the years. They do not always occur in the same field every year, sometimes they appear at the top of the hill by the ancient Ridgeway path that routes from Avebury and onto Barbury Castle. However, this field did have a circle in 2016 and in fact one of the top too. The nearby Hackpen White Horse was cut to commemorate the coronation of Queen Victoria in 1838. Although little is known about the origins of the horse it is believed to have been cut by Henry Eatwell, parish clerk of Broad Hinton and also the local publican. The horse measures 90ft by 90ft and is best viewed from the A361 at Broad Hinton. You can read more about the horse here. The circle is in a field of wheat and as you can see from the photos below the field was full of discoloured patches, this is due to random spraying by the farmer – where random patches are sprayed and some are not. The formation measures approximately 150-180ft and is a interesting six-fold design, harlequin-esque design – a duality of light and dark. It reminded me of the six-pointed star at Blackwood in Hampshire in 2014, which although less complex was clearly of a similar design type. Six is the number of structure, function and order, but also a number of harmony. It is one of the so-called perfect numbers which are numbers that are the sum of their divisors – in this case 1 + 2...
Battlesbury Camp, Wilts |  5th July 2017

Battlesbury Camp, Wilts | 5th July 2017

Battlesbury Camp Hillfort, nr Warminster, Wiltshire. Battlesbury Camp Hillfort is one in a group of three or four of hill forts to the west of Warminster: Battlesbury Hillfort, Middle Hill, Scratchbury Hillfort and further out still Cotely Hill – all line the southern boundary of Salisbury Plain. The landscape here is beautiful from the air, the hills seemingly scooped and sculpted from the Wylye Valley. You can read more about Battlesbury Camp here and here. A Word of Warning for visitors and photographers. Looking at any Ordinance Survey map or online map of this area will show you that the location of this circle is just outside of the military Danger Area of Salisbury Plain, if you are walking in this area keep your eye out for red flags, this indicates that the area is active and you should not walk beyond them! However – for those wanting to fly over this circle, or fly their drones at this location, you will need to consult an aviation map, which shows that the aviation Danger Area extends beyond the perimeter for walkers and as a result you will need permission to fly in this area. Flying any aircraft in this area when active would be incredibly dangerous.  Photographic Enlargements: are now available of many of the 2017 crop circles click here to see our fantastic range. Visiting the Circles? If you are thinking of visiting any crop circles this summer, please read our Visiting the Crop Circles section. It’s full of useful information and etiquette for visiting the countryside and the crop circles. Please remember that you should not enter any...
Boreham Wood, Wiltshire | 1st July 2017

Boreham Wood, Wiltshire | 1st July 2017

Boreham Wood, nr Lockeridge, Wiltshire If you look at the Google Maps link on the left-hand side of this page you will see that this field has not always been used for agriculture – the Google Maps image shows the location as grass land rather than being planted with crops. The crop circle lies front and centre of the horseshoe shape of trees that is Boreham Wood. This circle is in fact very close-by to the previously reported circle at Langdean Bottom on the 26th of June. It is also very close to West Woods which have seen many formations in the fields close to it over the years. The ancient West Woods is popular with walkers, particularly in the spring where the woodland floor is carpeted with bluebells (wild flowers) – a very enchanting sight. West Woods also contains a small longbarrow known as West Woods Barrow, or Barrow Cospe. It’s quite hard to see as it just appears as a raised earthen mound and there are also several saracen stones in the area, but it is unknown if they have been there since ancient times, have been moved from original positions, or are more modern additions to the landscape. West Woods is a magical place to visit and is well worth a visit should you get the opportunity. You can read more about West Woods and Barrow Copse here. The crop circle measures approximately 200ft in diameter and is a seven-petalled flower contained within two concentric rings. At the centre of the flower is a stylised cube (hexagonal) – very much like the cube seen in the...
Langdean Bottom, Wiltshire | 26th June 2017

Langdean Bottom, Wiltshire | 26th June 2017

Langdean Bottom, nr East Kennett, Wiltshire (Reported elsewhere as Thorn Hill) This really is a very pretty location for a crop circle. Langdean Bottom (as it name suggests) is nestled in the bottom of a natural valley close to the village of East Kennet in Wiltshire. The ancient ridgeway pathway runs alongside this field and the landscape nearby is dotted with roundbarrows. Clearly visible from the air is nearby East Kennet long barrow. Unlike its sibling at West Kennet, this longbarrow remains un-excavated and it’s stones mostly covered by a large earthen mound and a copse of large trees stands on top. The longbarrow is on private land and so there is no official public access – but good views can be had from the nearby Ridgeway path. You can read more about East Kennet long barrow here and here. As you can see in some of the pictures below, the field is terminated at one end by a row of trees, on the other side of the trees is the remains of an old stone circle (or perhaps hut circle) – some of the stones can still be seen in the grass. You can read more about the site here and see pictures of the stones in situ. This crop circle has held up very well, it appeared on the 26th of June, but we did not photograph it until the 3rd of July due to a bout of particularly bad weather. However, it still looked crisp and the beautiful floor lay of the formation still looked impressive and intact. Clearly there had been animals in the crop (probably...