Hackpen Hill, Wilts | 8th July 2017

Hackpen Hill, Wilts | 8th July 2017

Hackpen Hill, nr Broad Hinton,Wiltshire Hackpen Hill is a regular site for crop circles and many have been seen there over the years. They do not always occur in the same field every year, sometimes they appear at the top of the hill by the ancient Ridgeway path that routes from Avebury and onto Barbury Castle. However, this field did have a circle in 2016 and in fact one of the top too. The nearby Hackpen White Horse was cut to commemorate the coronation of Queen Victoria in 1838. Although little is known about the origins of the horse it is believed to have been cut by Henry Eatwell, parish clerk of Broad Hinton and also the local publican. The horse measures 90ft by 90ft and is best viewed from the A361 at Broad Hinton. You can read more about the horse here. The circle is in a field of wheat and as you can see from the photos below the field was full of discoloured patches, this is due to random spraying by the farmer – where random patches are sprayed and some are not. The formation measures approximately 150-180ft and is a interesting six-fold design, harlequin-esque design – a duality of light and dark. It reminded me of the six-pointed star at Blackwood in Hampshire in 2014, which although less complex was clearly of a similar design type. Six is the number of structure, function and order, but also a number of harmony. It is one of the so-called perfect numbers which are numbers that are the sum of their divisors – in this case 1 + 2...
Battlesbury Camp, Wilts |  5th July 2017

Battlesbury Camp, Wilts | 5th July 2017

Battlesbury Camp Hillfort, nr Warminster, Wiltshire. Battlesbury Camp Hillfort is one in a group of three or four of hill forts to the west of Warminster: Battlesbury Hillfort, Middle Hill, Scratchbury Hillfort and further out still Cotely Hill – all line the southern boundary of Salisbury Plain. The landscape here is beautiful from the air, the hills seemingly scooped and sculpted from the Wylye Valley. You can read more about Battlesbury Camp here and here. A Word of Warning for visitors and photographers. Looking at any Ordinance Survey map or online map of this area will show you that the location of this circle is just outside of the military Danger Area of Salisbury Plain, if you are walking in this area keep your eye out for red flags, this indicates that the area is active and you should not walk beyond them! However – for those wanting to fly over this circle, or fly their drones at this location, you will need to consult an aviation map, which shows that the aviation Danger Area extends beyond the perimeter for walkers and as a result you will need permission to fly in this area. Flying any aircraft in this area when active would be incredibly dangerous.  Visiting the Circles? If you are thinking of visiting any crop circles this summer, please read our Visiting the Crop Circles section. It’s full of useful information and etiquette for visiting the countryside and the crop circles. Please remember that you should not enter any fields without the express permission of the farmer – and see above. Because the area has been active for...
Boreham Wood, Wiltshire | 1st July 2017

Boreham Wood, Wiltshire | 1st July 2017

Boreham Wood, nr Lockeridge, Wiltshire If you look at the Google Maps link on the left-hand side of this page you will see that this field has not always been used for agriculture – the Google Maps image shows the location as grass land rather than being planted with crops. The crop circle lies front and centre of the horseshoe shape of trees that is Boreham Wood. This circle is in fact very close-by to the previously reported circle at Langdean Bottom on the 26th of June. It is also very close to West Woods which have seen many formations in the fields close to it over the years. The ancient West Woods is popular with walkers, particularly in the spring where the woodland floor is carpeted with bluebells (wild flowers) – a very enchanting sight. West Woods also contains a small longbarrow known as West Woods Barrow, or Barrow Cospe. It’s quite hard to see as it just appears as a raised earthen mound and there are also several saracen stones in the area, but it is unknown if they have been there since ancient times, have been moved from original positions, or are more modern additions to the landscape. West Woods is a magical place to visit and is well worth a visit should you get the opportunity. You can read more about West Woods and Barrow Copse here. The crop circle measures approximately 200ft in diameter and is a seven-petalled flower contained within two concentric rings. At the centre of the flower is a stylised cube (hexagonal) – very much like the cube seen in the...
Langdean Bottom, Wiltshire | 26th June 2017

Langdean Bottom, Wiltshire | 26th June 2017

Langdean Bottom, nr East Kennett, Wiltshire (Reported elsewhere as Thorn Hill) This really is a very pretty location for a crop circle. Langdean Bottom (as it name suggests) is nestled in the bottom of a natural valley close to the village of East Kennet in Wiltshire. The ancient ridgeway pathway runs alongside this field and the landscape nearby is dotted with roundbarrows. Clearly visible from the air is nearby East Kennet long barrow. Unlike its sibling at West Kennet, this longbarrow remains un-excavated and it’s stones mostly covered by a large earthen mound and a copse of large trees stands on top. The longbarrow is on private land and so there is no official public access – but good views can be had from the nearby Ridgeway path. You can read more about East Kennet long barrow here and here. As you can see in some of the pictures below, the field is terminated at one end by a row of trees, on the other side of the trees is the remains of an old stone circle (or perhaps hut circle) – some of the stones can still be seen in the grass. You can read more about the site here and see pictures of the stones in situ. This crop circle has held up very well, it appeared on the 26th of June, but we did not photograph it until the 3rd of July due to a bout of particularly bad weather. However, it still looked crisp and the beautiful floor lay of the formation still looked impressive and intact. Clearly there had been animals in the crop (probably...
Longwood Warren, Hants | 17th June 2017

Longwood Warren, Hants | 17th June 2017

Longwood Warren, nr Cheesefoot Head, Hampshire (Reported elsewhere as Cheesefoot Head) This part of Hampshire has a long crop circle history with some of the earliest recorded crop circles appearing there in the 1970s and 1980s. The central feature of the landscape here is the Cheesefoot Head (or Matterly Bowl) which is a stunning natural amphitheatre that affords spectacular views of the surrounding countryside. In years gone by the Bowl was the location for several spectacular crop circles, but it is no longer planted with crops and now plays host to the Boomtown Fair music and culture festival each summer in August. This crop circle is located to the south of the amphitheatre on a tract of land called Longwood Warren, that would have been part of the estate once belonging to the now demolished Longwood House (read more here). This circle appears to be a motif based on the conjoining of the sun and moon – some immediately associated it with the coming eclipse on August 21st 2017 – which will be a total eclipse visible from some parts of the United States. More broadly speaking, this marriage is a union of Divine Opposites – Sun and Moon – and then all other seeming opposites. At it’s heart it is the integration of opposites leading to a new third state. This aspect of the design is in keeping with many others that hint at the transcending of duality into some new perception or way of thinking. Visiting the Circles? If you are thinking of visiting any crop circles this summer, please read our Visiting the Crop Circles section. It’s...
Badbury Rings, Dorset | 16th June 2017

Badbury Rings, Dorset | 16th June 2017

Target Wood, nr Badbury Rings, Dorset This crop circle lies close to Badbury Rings in Dorset. Badbury Rings is an Iron-Age hill fort which lies close to Blandford Forum in Dorset. It is one of the more attractive hill forts of its type with several ringed embankments and is topped by a copse of trees. We have had circles at Badbury Rings before most notably in 2014 (see here). You can read more about the site here. Badbury Rings is open to the pubic and offers some fantastic views of the surrounding countryside – the crop circle lies to the north west of the hill fort – and may be slightly too distant and too small to see from the summit of the hill. Visiting: This crop circle has now been harvested.  The design of this formation is instantly recognisable as a variation on the Kabbalah, or Tree of Life. It might be more accurately termed the Sephiroth a sacred design or mandala which represents a philosophy of the cosmos. The Kabbalah is part of an aspect of Jewish Mysticism, each of the 10 circles represent stages, or aspects of a cosmic, or spiritual path. You can read more about it here. We have seen the Tree of Life before as a crop circle in a field of Oilseed Rape (canola) at Barbury Castle in 1997 – so this new formation has appeared 20 years later in 2017. This time, the mandala is en-framed by a cross between a Star of David (classical hexgram – made from two opposing and overlaid equilateral triangles) and a unicursal hexagram (drawn in one...
Maiden Bradley, Wilts | 9th June 2017

Maiden Bradley, Wilts | 9th June 2017

Little Knoll, Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire Please note: we regret to report that this circle has now been cut out by the farmer. This crop circle was regretfully cut out by the farmer within 24 hours of it being reported so we were unable to photograph it before it was gone. However Karen has been able to draw a series of images for you to illustrate the design – see below. Maiden Bradley is close to Warminster and this circle was not that far away from the formation reported at Chicklade ten days earlier. The circle was in a field of barley and measured approximately 150-180ft in diameter. The centre circle was by all accounts rather beautiful with the crop woven into a warp and weft – like a basket. This is a five-fold design, a five armed wheel placed over a segmented pentagon, all enclosed within a containing circle. The circle is divided by ten to lay-out the design, five smaller circles make the spoked-wheel pattern. Five is the number of life, regeneration and Man. Visiting the Circles? If you are thinking of visiting any crop circles this summer, please read our Visiting the Crop Circles section. It’s full of useful information and etiquette for visiting the countryside and the crop circles. Please remember that you should not enter any fields without the express permission of the farmer. If you’d like to learn more about crop circle geometry we are running a hands-on Crop Circle Geometry Workshop at our annual conference this summer – July 28th-31st July, Devizes, Wiltshire. You can read more about our conference and workshop here. Please Help to keep us...
Woolstone Hill, Oxon | 4th June 2017

Woolstone Hill, Oxon | 4th June 2017

Woolstone Hill, nr Ashbury, Oxfordshire. Please Note: We hear this circle has now been partially defaced by the farmer. Please do not enter this field.  Uffington Castle is a Bronze-Age hill fort which sits atop an escarpment on the ancient Ridgeway pathway, where it crosses over from Wiltshire into Oxfordshire. It’s World-famous White Horse chalk hill-figure sits on the embankment of the hill and is the oldest chalk figure in the UK dating back approximately 3000 years. This whole area, encompassing the hill fort, white horse, Woolstone hill and Wayland’s Smithy barrow has set the scene for many crop circles over the past twenty years. It’s a beautiful part of our ancient landscape and if you’ve never been before we can highly recommend it! You can read more about Uffington White Horse and Castle here and here – with historical overview and visiting information. Drone enthusiasts please note that the flying of drones at Uffington is prohibited by the National Trust without their express permission – please see the links above for more information. This crop circle lies to the east of the hill fort near Woolstone Hill (see Google Maps link on the right of the page for precise location). It is in a field of Barley and measures approximately 150ft in diameter. It is a very pretty six-fold design made entirely from circles of various sizes. What makes this formation particularly curious is that all the circles inside the formation (18 in total) are standing with no flattened centres (or indeed any marks at all at their centres), the crop is instead swirled in pathways around the...
The Sanctuary, Wilts | 3rd June 2017

The Sanctuary, Wilts | 3rd June 2017

The Sanctuary, nr Avebury, Wiltshire. The Sanctuary is located close to the Ridgeway at West Overton. It lies beside the A4 which snakes its way between Marlborough and Devizes. The small stone circle dates back to 3000BC and is contemporary with, and an intrinsic part of the Avebury Complex of ancient monuments – which includes West Kennet Longbarrow and Silbury Hill. The site was first recorded by the antiquarian John Stukeley in the 1600s when it still had some of the small stones placed in several rings. These stones were not of the gargantuan variety found down the road at Avebury, but were very much smaller. Sometime before the 1900’s the stones were removed by a local farmer, so that the land could be used for agriculture, there are small concrete plinths there today which show where the stones would have been placed. Despite the fact no original stones remain the Sanctuary is still a rather charming and peaceful place (when the traffic on the main road is not too busy). It’s open to the public and is a great place for quiet contemplation and meditation. On the opposite side of the road are several bell barrows, known as the Overton Barrows. Some round barrows contained burials, while others are often points of alignments on the landscape. You can read more about the Sanctuary here (including visiting details) and more about the Overton Barrows here. The circle here is a simple ringed circle, very similar to some of the very earliest crop circle designs. It will be interesting to investigate whether there is any significant ratio between the diameter...