Blocks to Understanding

Blocks to Understanding

Etchilhampton, Wiltshire | 19th August 2015 | Wheat Note: You can click on any of the images in this blog for an enlarged view.  The second formation to appear at Etchilhampton in 2015 was also to be the last of the season. It was big, approximately 250ft in diameter, and was in a field of golden mature wheat. It looked impressive and majestic in the landscape. The geometry of the formation was rather novel. Nine stars ‘hold hands’ around the outer of the formation with two inner rows of nine small standing and flattened blocks in each. From the air one was immediately drawn to the ‘X’ shapes laid into the flattened crop, and as I sat down to draw this formation it was clear these X’s were a central part of the design as well as a very attractive part of the lay of the crop. There were twenty-seven X’s all together. Some of them were not used in the geometry of the design, but instead, gave anyone looking at the design an excellent pointer as to its construction. You can see some of the X’s in the large photo at the top of the page. The circle of the formation is divided into thirty-six segments and then seven concentric rings are created. Add in a narrow 8th outer ring to contain the entire design and the central circle and you nine. The entire design is picked from this geometric framework. The X’s helped create the nine hexagram stars which sat around the perimeter of the design. Interestingly, because of the way the framework was set out (partially in segments...
Liminality – By Robin Heath (Part 3)

Liminality – By Robin Heath (Part 3)

Crop Circles & the Geometry of Thresholds By Robin Heath We had the great pleasure of hearing Robin Heath deliver the keynote presentation at the Summer Crop Circle Lectures last year. It was one of the best lectures I’d heard him give in the long years I have known him; it was important, prescient and above all quite brilliant. He has very kindly given me permission to share that presentation with you and I will be posting Robin’s lecture notes and illustrations in a three part guest blog. I’d like to thank Robin for the opportunity to share his work on the Temporary Temples website – it’s a great honour! Robin Heath is an unaffiliated researcher into megalithic and ancient sciences. He is author of several books on Stonehenge, two of which are on sale at the monument. For more information, there are two websites:www.skyandlandscape.com and www.megalithicscience.org Robin lives on a smallholding in coastal West Wales with his wife Trish, two cats and three theodolites.   Please click on any of the images in this article for a larger view PART THREE (Click for part one and two) Some Conclusions from part two: The circle makers appear to be fully familiar with the traditional canon of measure. They incorporate this canon within beautiful (attention-seeking) designs, in plain sight, often adjacent to structures where the traditional canon was once employed, such as megalithic sites. It is possible that only people who understand both geometry and the canon of ancient measure can connect with the messages contained within crop circles. The principal (and apparently very gentle) message is that the circle builders are fully familiar with...
Liminality – by Robin Heath (Part 2)

Liminality – by Robin Heath (Part 2)

Crop Circles & the Geometry of Thresholds By Robin Heath We had the great pleasure of hearing Robin Heath deliver the keynote presentation at the Summer Crop Circle Lectures last year. It was one of the best lectures I’d heard him give in the long years I have known him; it was important, prescient and above all quite brilliant. He has very kindly given me permission to share that presentation with you and I will be posting Robin’s lecture notes and illustrations in a three part guest blog. I’d like to thank Robin for the opportunity to share his work on the Temporary Temples website – it’s a great honour! Robin Heath is an unaffiliated researcher into megalithic and ancient sciences. He is author of several books on Stonehenge, two of which are on sale at the monument. For more information, there are two websites:www.skyandlandscape.com and www.megalithicscience.org Robin lives on a smallholding in coastal West Wales with his wife Trish, two cats and three theodolites.   Please click on any of the images in this article for a larger view PART TWO (Click here for part one) Geometry, Astronomy & Astrology Threshold: the place between two different spaces or times From part one: … This is quite a varied set of views, opinions and suggestions, but it is representative of the kind of material that anyone investigation the crop circle phenomenon will come across during their searchings. It will lead at some stage to facing and hopefully answering the following questions… Part Two Who or what do we trust? Are there any absolute facts or anchor points? I believe that there are some answers, and now...
Liminality – by Robin Heath (Part 1)

Liminality – by Robin Heath (Part 1)

Crop Circles & the Geometry of Thresholds By Robin Heath We had the great pleasure of hearing Robin Heath deliver the keynote presentation at the Summer Crop Circle Lectures last year. It was one of the best lectures I’d heard him give in the long years I have known him; it was important, prescient and above all quite brilliant. He has very kindly given me permission to share that presentation with you and I will be posting Robin’s lecture notes and illustrations in a three part guest blog. I’d like to thank Robin for the opportunity to share his work on the Temporary Temples website – it’s a great honour! Robin Heath is an unaffiliated researcher into megalithic and ancient sciences. He is author of several books on Stonehenge, two of which are on sale at the monument. For more information, there are two websites:www.skyandlandscape.com and www.megalithicscience.org Robin lives on a smallholding in coastal West Wales with his wife Trish, two cats and three theodolites.   PART ONE Introduction Public interest in crop circles has always been discouraged by the media and many self-proclaimed ‘experts’, who in imitation of our political system have regularly fought vicious and sometimes personal campaigns against the views of those who have made a study of this mysterious phenomenon. Although, for a newcomer to this intriguing subject, it may appear that nobody agrees on anything with regard to the reason or purpose of the deluge of crop circles that seasonally locates itself in crop fields around the globe, there are some observable patterns in their type and locations. However, I do believe that we need to start asking...
To Infinity & Beyond!

To Infinity & Beyond!

Milk Hill, Nr Stanton St. Bernard, Wiltshire | 08.08.2008 | Wheat In my last two blogs I had been looking at two crop circles that appeared on the same date, the 8th of August 2015. But there was a formation that appeared back in 2008 on the 8th of August making the date the 8th day of the 8th Month 2008 – or 8-8-8. So I thought it might be an opportune moment to dive back into the archives and take a look at a formation that was yet another to appear on this date, but to have the added iteration of eight as the year that it appeared. An Alliteration of Time and Form? I wish I could find a word that would accurately describe the nature of the formation that appeared below Milk Hill between Alton Barnes and Stanton St Bernard, in Wiltshire on the 8th of August 2008 (8-8-8). The formation appeared as a huge figure eight in the landscape, made almost entirely from circles of varying dimensions. So it was a crop circle in the pattern of a figure eight which appeared on the 08.08.2008. If one were talking of prose, one might call it an alliteration, but what is the word for an alliteration of forms? I’m not sure there is one. One might call it a synchronicity of dates and design, but even this doesn’t quite fit. Synchronicities (according to Jung) occur when there is an arational connection between something in the inner and outer worlds which has meaning for the person experiencing it. Here the connection was between time and form, and...
The Dark Eye of the Soul

The Dark Eye of the Soul

Bowerchalke, Wiltshire, 2015. In my last blog I looked at the 2015 dove formation at Hampton Lucy that appeared on the 8th of August. There was however, a second formation to appear on that date at Bowerchalke in Wiltshire. This circle was totally different in character and design and it is a circle I have struggled to come to terms with during the intervening months since its appearance. So I decided to confront this image again and to do a little work with it to see what I could uncover and learn about its design, symbolism and geometry. Perhaps in immersing myself in this formation I could uncover a little about its effects on me, but I was filled with trepidation, this symbol has dark associations that made me decidedly uncomfortable. On the whole, the crop circle phenomenon is one filled with light, grace, beauty and spirit. While some designs, like the dove at Hampton Lucy (and many others such as labyrinths, stars, moons, spirals, and even the Kabbalah) are familiar human shapes, the vast majority  of formations are kind of ‘iconically neutral’, that is to say they have no immediate meaning. Many are entirely geometric, filled with numbers and proportions one might interpret, but they are unfamiliar in the sense they are designs we have not seen used before in other settings. While the crop circles have presented us with both the familiar and the unfamiliar in their designs, the images are on the whole uplifting and inspirational; it is rare indeed for the phenomenon to present us with something that is unsettling and even rarer still that...
A Bird’s Eye View

A Bird’s Eye View

Hampton Lucy, Warwickshire 2015 One of the most iconic formations of the 2015 season occurred on the 8th of the 8th. In fact there were two formations reported on that date, but the other is a story for another time. Birds have often been portrayed by the crop circle phenomenon, some have been identified as swallows, others as a phoenix, one a Thunderbird.  In fact 2015 had seen the appearance of another bird, identified as a native American ‘Eagle Dancer’, at Uffcott Down on the 25th of July. Symbolically in this context, birds are seen as otherworldly, ethereal, even numinous. They carry a spiritual connotation (like the spirit not bound too earth). More specifically, like the crop circles, they seem to haunt the space between worlds, messengers of the Gods, a conduit between Heaven and Earth. Like so many crop circle symbols, such as the squaring of the circle, or the marriage of the same, they address the connection between the Man and the Divine, or between this world and some other unseen realm. Unlike the stupendously gigantic flock of swallows in East Field, Alton Barnes 2008, this little bird was far more humble, it measured approximately 180ft in diameter and was in a field of mature golden wheat at its perfected peak, ready for harvesting. When we flew over the circle, it was in one of the last remaining fields still standing in the area. DREAMING  Bird To many this bird was a Dove, it’s design very close to the classical Christian icon of the descending grace of God at the baptism of Christ. Leonardo Da Vinci was...
It’s Written in the Stars

It’s Written in the Stars

As I write – October 2015 – I’m working on the forthcoming annual Crop Circle Year Book for 2015. As part of putting the book together I’m now revisiting many of the formations from this season and starting to look at them in detail. Of course the size and scope of the year books give room for only the most concise analysis and discussion – but in the coming months I hope to share some of the things I have looked at for inclusion in the book in a series of blogs. The Haselor Star 19th July 2015 Haselor, is located very near to the town of Alcester in Warwickshire (not too far from Stratford-Upon-Avon) and in recent years particularly, the county of Warwickshire has seen a collection of very fine crop circles within its borders. Alcester is identified as an old Roman settlement. At first glance the crop circle at Haselor was undoubtedly a design based around the number eight, with its eight-pointed star being the main feature. The formation is made from a series of concentric circles and offset circles which create a crescent in the middle part of the design – 5 circles in all. In the offset centre circle sits the very fine eight-pointed star, the points are standing and as they approach the centre circle the arms cross over and under one another in Celtic Knot-like fashion. From five of the points of the star, emanate straight lines that reach out through the crescent, to the outer band of standing crop. Where the offset circle touches the outer band at the bottom of the design there is...
Welcome to our New Website

Welcome to our New Website

Welcome to our new website It’s been a long time coming, but our lovely new website is finally finished and published. It’s been a very, very steep learning curve to get it here. Until now Steve and I have always handed the running of our website over to others. For the first time we have decided it was time to learn how to do it for ourselves, and as complete novices that’s not been easy! Neither one of us has ever edited a website before. It’s something we have avoided, and while I’m quite a quick learner of most new things, much of this process has been counter intuitive to me and I’ve had to press myself very hard to get a grip on it! Both of us would like to thank all who helped in the building of this website, especially Sam and Chris who have patiently talked us through all the things we have needed to learn to get to where we are today – thanks so much! Improved Image Galleries As with all challenges, this one has been an opportunity too. One of the most satisfying things about putting this website together has been filling out our Image Library. Steve has spent hours, days and weeks going through his old negatives and transparencies from the early years and picking out images that we wanted to share. It’s been a massive undertaking, scanning, cleaning up scratches and age related imperfections, but it was amazing to realise what a legacy that collection of images is and to reminisce about our years in the fields, finding lost formations and...